Athletics

A good friend of the festival, Mike O’Grady, is returning this year to once again take pictures of the athletes and WW competing!! We are excited to have him back and Here are some of his photos:

Frederick Celtic Festival 2008 WDSC_6657 WDSC_6580 WDSC_6551 WDSC_6512 MV_DSC_7159 LB_DSC_7202 Frederick Celtic Festival 2008 DSC_7373

Classes and participants

Wounded Warriors (click for extended bio)

Mark Little (Sapper)

After serving 4 years enlisted as a Sapper Platoon Squad Leader, Mark commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant in the U.S. Army. As a Lieutenant, Mark deployed with the 3rd Infantry Division to Iraq. In 99 days of operations, Mark led over 150 combat patrols, was struck by 3 IED’s, awarded 2 Purple Hearts and the Bronze Star. On September 7th, 2007; Mark’s final IED caused him to lose both of his legs below the knee and sent him to Walter Reed for recovery. Following recovery, Mark has become an avid cross fitter, a member of the Scottish American Military Society, and has been bitten by the Highland Games bug after competing here for the first time at the Frederick Highland Games!

Jason Sturm

In 2002, while field training at Ft. Drum, a 105mm Artillery round fell 1.5 miles short of it target; landing five feet behind him. As he laid on the ground slowly bleeding out, he chose to administer first aid to another injured soldier before he began receiving first aid for his own injuries. Jason’s left leg was amputated below the knee after 8 long months of rehabilitative therapy and limb salvage. Jason is also returning for his second time at the Frederick Highland Games!

Chris Carlsen (Ranger)

1LT Chris Carlsen, US Army, retired. In 2003, Chris deployed to Iraq as an Infantry Platoon Leader with the 82nd Airborne Division. Chris led 8 months of combat operations in Fallujah and Iraq’s “Triangle of Death”, and was awarded the Bronze Star. In 2004, Chris was injured in a military vehicle rollover. He sustained injuries which led to the amputation of his right leg below the knee. Following his recovery, Chris has continued to challenge himself with marathons, CrossFit, and now the Highland Games. Chris is also returning for his second time at the Frederick Highland Games!

Professionals (click for extended bio)

Eric Frasure

Beau Fay

Mike Zolkiewicz

John Collins

Amateurs:(click for extended bio)

Jerry Witzman
David Marble

James McLean

Captain James McLean U.S. Marine Corps, joined the service at a very young age when he climbed in his father’s combat boots and rendered his first salute at the age of 2. He commissioned as a Second Lieutenant in the Marine Corps on 19 May 2004. Shortly after he met his beautiful wife Katie and transferred to Marine Intelligence. He has deployed to the Middle East on two combat deployments to Afghanistan in 2009-2010 & 2011 with Marine Air Group 40 and 2nd Marine Air Wing Forward. He now serves as the Commanding Officer for Marine Detachment Fort Belvoir, VA. James’ favorite heavy events are the hammer throw and caber toss because they both look and sometimes feel like they should be impossible but can be overcome with technique, strength and panache. Semper Fidelis.

WOMEN:

Bonnie Hicks

Heather McKenzie

Julie Dyer

Becky Wissink

Devonna Blevins-Marble

Megan Zerfas

Nikita Halteman

Denise Gross

MASTERS

Patrick McNamee

Robert Hicks

Robert Monroe

Christopher Burns

Aaron Miller

Sam Parlow

Will Donnell

Bryan McClain

Tim Ross

Richard McClain

 Please contact us if interested in participating!

Thanks also to MASA Photographer Karen Bishop!  Here are some of her Photos from our 2013 festival! : Facebook album

 

Braemar Stone Toss

gamesstone The Braemar Stone Toss is named for the ancient festival held in Braemar, Scotland, that requires that a heavy stone be put from a standing position, creating a test that relies as much on strength as technique.

The Braemar stone, weighing between 22 and 28 pounds, is thrown from a stand. The athlete cannot use a run-up approach or spin; instead, both feet must remain stationary until the stone is released.

The athlete must not go past the wooden trig (a toe board that marks the backline and frontline) or touch the ground with any part of his body other than his feet.

 

 


Open Stone Toss

gamesstonetossThe “clachneart,” or stone toss, is one of the world’s most ancient tests of strength.

The challenge has always been simple: See who can throw a sizeable creek stone the farthest. T

he Open Stone Toss developed into today’s track and field shot put event.

The Open Stone Toss allows a run-up or spinning approach, with the stone usually weighing between 16 and 18 pounds. The contestant must keep at least one foot within the sidelines of the 4’6″ wide and 7’6″ deep throwing box at all times. The trig cannot be crossed at any time during the throw.

 

 


Heavy Weight Toss

gamesheavyweight In Scotland, the traditional measure of weight is a “stone,” which equals 14 pounds.

Block weights weighing two stones (28 lbs.) and four stones (56 lbs.) were used to balance scales for measuring grain.

These weights were thrown by locals gathering around the grain store to determine who was the strongest man in the village.

The contestant must keep at least one foot within the sidelines of the 4’6″ wide and 9′ deep throwing box at all times.

The backline and frontline – marked by the toe board called a “trig” – cannot be crossed at any time during the throw.

 

 


Light Weight Toss

gameslightweight Drawing from the same roots as the Heavy Weight, the two-stone Light Weight is 28 pounds and was originally used to measure out grain.

The modern track and field 35 lb. weight throw is derived from Highland Games weight tosses.

The contestant must keep at least one foot within the sidelines of the 4’6″ wide and 9′ deep throwing box at all times.

The trig cannot be crossed at any time during the throw.

 

 

 


Heavy Hammer Throw

gamesheavyhammer Throwing the massive rock quarryman’s hammer is a test of strength developed hundreds of years ago.

Being even larger than the blacksmith’s hammer, the 22 lb. heavy hammer remains an event unique to the Highland Games.

The athletes will throw the hammer with their feet remaining stationary, aided by metal spikes that are mounted to the bottoms of their boots and jammed into the ground.

The thrower must remain behind the trig, avoid falling over and touching the ground, and keep both feet firmly planted until the hammer has been released.

 

 

 


Caber Toss

gamescaber The caber toss draws upon the distant past to establish this test of strength and skill as the king of Highland Games Heavy Events.

Caber is Gaelic for tree, and lumberjacks are believed to provide the origin by turning

small trees end-over-end to cross small rivers. Soon, attacking warriors started landing 20′ tree trunks against castle walls during siege, using them as crude ladders.

The Caber Toss is the only event that isn’t measured for height or distance. Instead, judges score the event in a subjective manner.

A perfect score occurs when an athlete is able to turn the caber end-over-end, with the caber landing in line with the athlete’s direction of momentum, resulting in a 12:00 score on an imaginary clock face.

If the caber turns, but does not land straight in front of the athlete, scores between 9:00 and 3:00 are assigned. If the caber does not turn, the side judge awards a degree score up to 90°.

Due to its subjective nature, and the fact that almost every competition provides a different caber, there are no records, only bragging rights.


Sheaf Toss

gamessheath The sheaf toss originates from one of the most practical and common farm chores: Throwing sheaves of hay up into the barn loft.

Traditionally contested at county agricultural fairs, the sheaf toss has made its way into the Highland Games over the last 100 years, becoming a fan favorite along the way.

Using a traditional 3-tyne hay fork, the athlete attempts to throw a burlap bag stuffed with materials such as straw or bailing twine over a horizontal bar.

Each athlete gets three attempts at each increasing height until there is a winner, with misses being counted against them should two or more athletes tie at a height.

 

 


Weight Over Bar

gamesweightoverbar The standing Weight Over Bar, or weight for height as it is often called, is a tried-and-true test of brute strength and explosiveness.

Originating from similar traditions as the weights tossed for distance, this is a staple event that is also often contested in strongman contests.

The rules are minimal, simply stand under a horizontal bar and throw a 56 lb. weight over it with one hand.

A running or spinning approach is allowed at the discretion of the field judge.

Each athlete gets three attempts at each increasing height until there is a winner, with misses being counted against them should two or more athletes tie at a height.

 

 

 

First Highland Games Challenge in Camp Leatherneck Afghanistan!!: